• Cold and Flu Season

    Influenza causes more hospitalizations among young children than any other vaccine-preventable disease. The single best way to protect against seasonal flu and its potential severe complications is for children to get a seasonal influenza vaccine each year (cited per the CDC). Flu vaccination is recommended for all children aged 6 months and older. Making healthy choices at school and at home can help prevent the flu and spreading flu to others.

     

    Timing

    The timing of flu can vary from season to season. In the United States, seasonal flu activity most commonly peaks in the U.S. between December and February, but flu viruses can cause illness from early October to late May.

     

    Transmission

    Flu viruses are thought to spread mainly from person to person through coughs and sneezes of infected people. Less often, a person might also get the flu by touching a surface or object that has flu virus on it and then touching their own mouth, eyes or possibly their nose.

     

    Prevention

    Everyday Prevention Measures from the CDC

    • Stay home when you are sick. If possible, stay home from work, school, and errands when you are sick. You will help prevent others from catching your illness. Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
    • Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue away after use and wash your hands. If a tissue is not available, cover your mouth and nose with your sleeve, not your hand.
    • Wash your hands often with soap and water, especially after you cough or sneeze. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand rub.
    • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth. Germs spread this way.
    • Clean and disinfect surfaces or objects. Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces at home, work or school, especially when someone is ill.

     

    For more info:

    MDH Screening Tool - Is It Influenza?

    MDH Fact Sheet For Parents